This Newsletter

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Facing Up to the Long-term Future of Your Genealogy Society

Win Tickets to MyHeritage LIVE, Including a Free Stay at the Iconic Hilton Amsterdam

Libraries without Librarians

Update: Libraries without Librarians

Randy Majors Adds Still More Functionality to his Genealogy Mapping Web Site that Works with Google Maps: Township, Range, and Section

The Popularity of Your Last Name

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) What is a Wiki and Why Should I Care?

Brooklyn Library Digitizes Thousands of Historic Newspaper Articles

How 23andMe Will Mine its Giant DNA Database for Health and Wealth

3 Arrested in France for Looting the Archives of Libraries Throughout Europe

New Irish Historical Birth, Marriage and Death Registers Available Online for Public to Access

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Can You Trust Online Genealogy Data?

National Geographic Society’s Genographic DNA Project to Shut Down

How Your Privacy Will Be Protected in the 2020 Census

Free World War I Genealogy PDF Guide Offered

The ‘Clotilda,’ the Last Known Slave Ship to Arrive in the U.S., Is Found

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Publishing Your Genealogy Book on Demand

Using a Chromebox as My Primary Day-to-day Computer

GEDmatch Implements Required Opt-In for Law Enforcement Matching

The Reasons Why GEDmatch Recently Changed Its Terms of Service

MyHeritage Offers Free Access to Military Records for Memorial Day

Geoff Rasmussen of FamilyTreeWebinars.com Announces a Rare 50% off Special on Webinar Memberships

23andMe is Updating Ancestry Results Without Telling Users

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Downsizing: the Paperless Office for Genealogists

Book Review: Abstracts of the Debt Books of the Provincial Land Office of Maryland

Announcing the MyHeritage DNA Health and Ancestry Test

A Village in France Will Pay You $2,240 to Decipher a Rock

Preserving Pennsylvania’s Oldest Historical Documents

Update: a Genealogy Cruise to Bermuda and to Newport, Rhode Island in 2020 with Cruise Everything

Cool Location Explorer on Google Maps – a Tool for GeoGeeks

Findmypast offers New Opportunities to Discover and Find Connections in Europe

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

New Free Historical Records on FamilySearch: Week of May 13, 2019

TheGenealogist is Expanding its Occupational Records with over 300,000 Records of Masters and Apprentices included in a Nautical Set of Apprenticeship Records

W.S. Clark Store of Tarboro, North Carolina Accounting Ledgers are Now Online at DigitalNC

A Success in Fighting Diabetes

Update: A Success in Fighting Diabetes

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

NOTE: If you are a Plus Edition subscriber and yet you did not receive the email notice in your in-box, take a look in your spam folder. It probably is there. Most email programs have (optional) filters that you can specify to make sure future Plus Edition notices get sent correctly to your in-box. For instance, GMail users can find instructions at https://blog.eogn.com/2014/09/07/how-to-make-gmail-always-place-this-newsletter-in-the-in-box-not-in-the-spam-folder/. Most other email programs have similar capabilities.

To all non-subscribers:

If you would like to read this week’s Plus Edition newsletter, you can sign up for a subscription by looking at the menus to the right and clicking on “Subscribe to or Renew the Plus Edition Newsletter.” Once you subscribe, you will be given immediate access to the Plus Edition web site and will be able to read the latest Plus Edition newsletter, along with the two previous weekly Plus Edition editions.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Dick Eastman at https://blog.eogn.com/contact-dick-eastman.

On the Road Again, This Time to the NGS Conference in St. Charles, Missouri

This is a quick notice to let you know there may not be as many articles as normal posted in this newsletter in the next few days. I will be in St. Charles, Missouri from now through the end of the week. I am attending the annual conference of the (U.S.) National Genealogical Society. See https://conference.ngsgenealogy.org for details about the conference.

I hope to write about the conference events that I see and attend. I suspect I will also post a number of photographs of the conference in this newsletter while I am there. Who knows? I may even get to attend a few presentations!

I should be back home next week.

Stay tuned!

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Finding Unmarked Graves with Ground Penetrating Radar

Book Review: Grow Your Own Family Tree

Book Review: In Their Words, A Genealogist’s Translation Guide to Polish, German, Latin, and Russian Documents

Facebook Launches New Tool to Help Users Memorialize Loved Ones

Researchers Want to Link Your Genes to Your Income but Should They?

On the Road Again, this time to NERGC

I will warn you there may not be as many articles as normal posted in this newsletter in the next week. If you have been reading this newsletter for some time, you already know that I often travel to genealogy conferences.

By the time you read this, I will should be en route to Manchester, New Hampshire. I will be attending the New England Regional Genealogical Consortium’s conference in Manchester, New Hampshire.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Leave Your Existing Genealogy Program Behind and Look to the Future

How to Find Some of the More Obscure Collections of Genealogy Records

Is That Book Still Under Copyright?

TheGenealogist Announces Map Explorer

Dinner Menu for the EOGN Dinner on Saturday Evening, March 2

This is a follow-up to my previous article, You are Invited to the EOGN Dinner after the RootsTech Conference in Salt Lake City!, available at: https://wp.me/p5Z3-77H.

During the “meet and greet” that starts at 6:30pm, we will enjoy an Italian Antipasti:

Cured Italian meats: salami, prosciutto di Parma, spicy capicola, with marinated
mozzarella and gorgonzola

Vegetable antipasto to include: caponata, roasted peppers with pesto, sun dried
tomatoes in olive oil, artichoke hearts, grilled asparagus, olives, and balsamic pearl
onions

Bakery basket with Artisan breads

The cash bar also will be available during this time.

Dinner will be served buffet-style at 7:30pm:

You are Invited to the EOGN Dinner after the RootsTech Conference in Salt Lake City!

Are you planning on attending the RootsTech conference this year? If so, would you like to join a large group of genealogists for dinner on Saturday evening? If so, you are invited!

RootsTech2019 promises to be the biggest genealogy conference in the world! It will be held on February 27 through March 2 in Salt Lake City. I have written several times about RootsTech2019 (see https://duckduckgo.com/?q=site%3Aeogn.com+rootstech2019&t=h_&ia=web for my previous articles).  Of course, a lot more information is also available at http://www.rootstech.org.

More than 20,000 people are expected to attend this year’s RootsTech conference and I expect that will include many readers of this newsletter. If you are planning to attend, would you like to join me and a bunch of newsletter readers for dinner on Saturday evening after the conference ends? That will be on March 2 at the Radisson Hotel, 215 W S Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101. The location literally is just a few steps from the Salt Palace conference center. And yes, if you have attended one of my previous dinners after RootsTech, this year’s dinner is in the same room in the same hotel as the last few years.

You are invited!

You can make a reservation now at http://eogn.com/rootstech2019. You are invited to join us if:

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

You are Invited to the EOGN Dinner after the RootsTech Conference in Salt Lake City!

(+) Why Isn’t It Available Online?

Your DNA Ethnicity Report Probably Will Change Over Time

The Cemetery Symbol of Eternal Love

Will a Chromebook Computer Run Genealogy Programs?

Betty Clay, R.I.P.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

Announcing MyHeritage LIVE 2019

MyHeritage Offers Free Access to Marriage Records for Valentine’s Day

Are You Recording Fairy Tales in Your Genealogy Records?

Attention French-Canadian Descendants: You Are Undoubtedly Related to Almost All Other French-Canadians

Tracing the Founding Fathers of Tristan da Cunha

The KIC Self-Serve Book Scanning Stations

The U.S. Census Bureau Will Test a Citizenship Question Ahead of the 2020 Census

Judge Declines to Block Citizenship Question from the 2020 Census on Privacy Grounds

On the Road Again, This Time to Bangkok

By the time you read this, I will probably be en route to Bangkok, Thailand. I will warn you there may not be as many articles as normal posted in this newsletter in the next week.

If you have been reading this newsletter for some time, you already know that I often travel to genealogy conferences. This time it is a personal trip, not related to genealogy.

I will have a laptop computer with me and will be staying in a modern hotel with wi-fi connectivity. However, I hope to maximize my time sightseeing and minimize my online time.

In addition, when traveling, one sometimes encounters unpleasant and unexpected problems, such as wi-fi that doesn’t work properly or a laptop computer that suddenly fails. Please don’t be surprised if I disappear for a few days.

This Newsletter is Twenty-Three Years Old!

It’s time to raise a glass of bubbly and celebrate! Yes, I am celebrating this newsletter’s twenty-third anniversary.

Wow! Where did the time go? It seems like only yesterday that I decided to start writing a genealogy newsletter for a few of my friends and acquaintances. Well, it wasn’t yesterday… it was 23 years ago today!

Never in my wildest dreams did I ever dream that 23 years would be so interesting, so much fun, and so rewarding. The very first edition of Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter was sent on January 15, 1996.

Don’t Print These Articles!

NOTE: This is an updated repeat of an article I published more than a year ago. The question arouse again today in an email message from a newsletter reader. I decided that it is time to encourage all newsletter readers to stop wasting paper, toner, and ink.

Warning: This article contains personal opinions.

A newsletter reader asked today, “Is there a way to print out (I know; I am bad) an item without all of the right column (Subscribe, Read, Steal, Search, Links, Etc.) being printed? A recent blog was 23 pages of the blog but would have printed out 45 pages in all. If not, OK. I can watch and halt the printing, when I remember.”

My answer may have surprised the person who asked. I replied, “I strongly recommend that you NEVER print anything and thereby waste paper! I save lots of articles from many different web sites but never print anything, if I can avoid it. I work hard to keep a paperless lifestyle.”

Actually, you are free to print most anything in this newsletter and even forward most items or republish them elsewhere, as you please. See https://blog.eogn.com/copyrights-and-other-legal-things for details. However, I try hard to never print anything and I suggest you do the same.

Why waste paper?

On the Road Again, this time to Oslo, Norway

By the time you read this, I will probably be in Oslo, Norway. I will warn you there may not be as many articles as normal posted in this newsletter in the next week.

If you have been reading this newsletter for some time, you already know that I often travel to genealogy conferences. This time, I will attend the MyHeritage LIVE 2018 Conference in Oslo, Norway.

Creating a Secure Connection to EOGNPLUS.com or to Any Other Secure Web Site

When I sent out a message announcing the new Plus Edition web site at http://www.eognplus.com several readers responded that they were receiving messages saying the web site connection was insecure. Please keep in mind that the security of the connection is under YOUR control. You can make a secure or an insecure connection as you wish. The secret is the letter “s”.

If you want a secure connection to any web site, make sure you specify that a secure connection is required by using an address that begins with “https”. The letter “s” in the beginning of the address is critical as it specifies a SECURE (or encrypted) connection.

For instance, the following will give you a secure connection:

https://www.eognplus.com   (notice the letter “s” in “https”)

If you leave the letter “s” out of “https://” you will often be connected via an insecure (unencrypted) connection. However, that does vary a bit depending upon the software in use in the web server.

Attention Plus Edition Subscribers: the Plus Edition Web Site is Being Moved

This is a short note to all Plus Edition subscribers:

After procrastinating for far too long, I am moving the Plus Edition subscribers’ web site to https://www.eognplus.com. You might want to update your bookmarks.

This replaces the old web site at http://www.eogn.com/wp/.

The old web site needed several software updates to remain operational. In fact, a couple of things broke recently and could not be fixed without significant software updates. I thought about it a bit and decided to move the site to a different hosting service and to install all new software. The end result will hopefully be a more stable web site.

RSS Newsfeeds Explained

NOTE: This is an article I published four years ago. The subject recently arose again and I realized that many newsletter readers are unaware of the simple way to read this newsletter, other blogs, and many other web sites that publish new articles more-or-less daily. I decided to make some additions to the original article and then republish it for the benefit of those who haven’t read the four-year-old version:

You may have noticed that this newsletter and several other genealogy Web sites are available via RSS news feeds. So are thousands of other Web news sites covering a wide variety of topics. This article will hopefully explain what RSS feeds are and what they can offer you.

RSS is an abbreviation for “rich site summary” or “really simple syndication.” Most people don’t need to remember this definition any more than they would spell out “ATM.” As to the word “feed,” this simply describes the way information gets to people: web servers “feed” their information to those who ask for it. For those who want more technical detail, RSS feeds are composed in XML, a format that is similar to HTML, the standard language in which many Web pages are created. For a rather technical explanation of RSS, look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RSS.

RSS has been available for years but many people are not yet aware of its capabilities. RSS can simplify your life and save time. It is an excellent method of avoiding the flood of internet security problems and email overload. RSS has become a popular way for news publishers to provide information without sending computer users to different Web sites, cluttering their email with spam, or exposing them to adware, spyware, worms, or viruses. These factors make it equally attractive to those who read their information.