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Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

You are Invited to the EOGN Dinner after the RootsTech Conference in Salt Lake City!

(+) Why Isn’t It Available Online?

Your DNA Ethnicity Report Probably Will Change Over Time

The Cemetery Symbol of Eternal Love

Will a Chromebook Computer Run Genealogy Programs?

Betty Clay, R.I.P.

The U.S. Census Bureau Will Test a Citizenship Question Ahead of the 2020 Census

Sadly, politics has again reared its ugly head again in the simple act of counting the population of the United States, as required by Article 1, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution: “The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct.”

Sadly, the simple words of “in such Manner as they shall by Law direct” has been debated by various political groups as to what data is to be collected. I have written before about the latest simple issue: should a U.S. resident be asked about his or her citizenship? You can see my past articles about this issue by starting at: https://blog.eogn.com/?s=2020+census.

The simple question about asking about citizenship in the 2020 US Census has resulted in at least six lawsuits.

Why Was the Information Removed from Online?

NOTE: This is a slightly updated version of an article I published three years ago. I have added a new section about the restrictions recently added by the European GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation).

Several newsletter readers have sent messages to me expressing dissatisfaction with records that were available online at one time but have since disappeared. I am offering this republished article as an explanation about why we should not be surprised when that happens. I will also offer a suggestion as to making sure you keep your own copies of online records that are valuable to you.

Two newsletter readers sent email messages to me recently expressing dissatisfaction that a set of images of vital records has been removed from a popular genealogy site. Indeed, removal of any online records of genealogical value is sad, but not unusual. Changes such as these are quite common on FamilySearch, MyHeritage, Ancestry.com, Fold3, Findmypast, and many other genealogy sites that provide images of old records online. Removal of datasets has occurred dozens of times in the past, and I suspect such things will continue to happen in the future. I thought I would write a brief explanation.

Contracts

The History of Groundhog Day

groundhogEvery February 2nd, residents of the United States turn their attention to the small town of Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. A group of men in top hats put a groundhog on a log in front of hundreds of people and wait for it to notice or not notice its own shadow. If Phil the groundhog sees his shadow, we’re supposed to have six more weeks of winter. If he doesn’t see it, winter is supposed to end earlier.

NOTE: A groundhog is also known as a woodchuck. It is a member of the family of rodents known as marmots.

A rodent in Pennsylvania, watched by men in top hats, can tell what the weather will be like for the next several weeks? Sounds strange to me! Actually, it is based upon the traditions of some of our ancestors.

The Great Molasses Flood of January 15, 1919

Today is the 100th anniversary of one of the biggest twentieth-century disasters in the city of Boston, Massachusetts. Genealogists normally like to study the current events of the times in which our ancestors lived. Wars are easy to study as they are well documented in history books. Yet other calamities of bygone times are often not so well known and documented.

One great disaster in the early twentieth century was the great Molasses Flood of January 15, 1919, in Boston, Massachusetts. This sounds humorous until one reads that 21 people died when an eight-foot high wall of molasses rolled down Commercial Street at a rather high speed. Two million gallons of crude molasses can move quickly when warmed by the sun. The result was an explosion heard many miles away.

Boston Post of January 16, 1919

More than 144,700 Worcestershire Baptism Records added to TheGenealogist and a Further 20,000 Individuals on Headstones

The following announcement was written by the folks at TheGenealogist:

TheGenealogist is releasing the records of 144,793 individuals added to their Worcestershire Baptisms (in Partnership with Malvern FHS) and an additional 20,000 individuals on headstones from the UKIndexer project where volunteers help their fellow genealogists by indexing and/or photographing the monumental inscriptions in churchyards and cemeteries.

  • Discover dates of ancestors’ baptisms
  • Glean names of parents of those baptised in Worcestershire
  • Headstones give dates and name details of those buried and sometimes familiar relationships
  • Memorials can reveal information not recorded elsewhere for ancestors

St. Giles – Imber

Information About Family Members is Available Wherever You Find It

There is one recent heartwarming story about two brothers who unexpectedly were told about a YouTube video of their father, filmed in 1952 and then converted to a digital video much later. It provided an insight to their father’s life several years before the births of the brothers.

There’s no genealogy information in the video for you or me but it does show a wonderful gift to the two brothers. It also teaches all genealogists to keep looking for information about relatives in the most unusual places.

A Day at the Genealogy Library

Copyright by Dave Carpenter and CartoonCollections. Please do not republish elsewhere. Published in eogn.com with the permission of the copyright holders.

You Can’t Call the Mormons “Mormons” Anymore

The Salt Lake Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The president of the Mormon church reiterated Sunday that he wants members, the media and others to use the faith’s full name, saying nicknames are “a major victory for Satan.” Addressing The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ twice-yearly conference in Salt Lake City, Russell M. Nelson said the church’s name “is not negotiable.”

The name of the religion based in Salt Lake City is now officially The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. All future references to the church, including its millions of genealogy records and its genealogy library in Salt Lake City, should use the full name: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

ISFHWE Excellence-In-Writing Competition Winners Announced

The following announcement was written by the International Society of Family History Writers and Editors (ISFHWE):

The International Society of Family History Writers and Editors is proud to announce the winners of the Excellence-in-Writing Competition. All entries were exceptional this year. Submission details for 2019 will be announced soon. For any questions on the competition, email competition@isfhwe.org.

Please note there were not many submissions this year; some categories are not even represented. We hope next year you will consider submitting and showcasing your writing skills.

Category 2 – Articles

Korean War 65th Anniversary Commemoration aboard USS Hornet Sea, Air & Space Museum

The following announcement was written by the USS Hornet Sea, Air & Space Museum:

ALAMEDA, CA – The USS Hornet Sea, Air & Space Museum is honored to host a commemoration marking the 65th anniversary of the end of the Korean War on Saturday, July 28, from 11 a.m. to noon. This event will include a slide presentation, a variety of guest speakers, and recognition of those who served in Korea.

The Museum opens at 10 a.m. and closes at 5 p.m. General admission applies, free admission for veterans and Museum members.

Happy Canada Day!

This video from Canadian Heritage seems most appropriate this weekend.

Happy Birthday Canada!

(US) National Archives Publishes FOIA Advisory Committee Report

The following is a message sent by Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson of the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies’ Public Records Access Monitoring Committee:

US Archivist David S. Ferriero announced the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Advisory Committee completed its final report and recommendations. The report may be read at https://www.archives.gov/files/final-report-and-recommendations-of-2016-2018-foia-advisory-committee.pdf. The committee took 2-years to complete its work. While there were government officials, FOIA government officers, lawyers, history professors, and consumer advocates there were no genealogists on the committee.

Some of the issues the recommendations are directed at include: promoting the proactive disclosure of records, improving agencies’ ability to identify responsive digital records, and reinforcing that FOIA is everyone’s responsibility, not just the responsibility of full-time FOIA professionals.

TheGenealogist adds more records to its new 1921 census substitute

The following announcement was written by TheGenealogist:

With the 1921 census still some years away from public release, TheGenealogist has added to its 1921 census substitute. This resource covers a large number of county directories which have been transcribed to produce a searchable resource. This appears under Census Records as the 1921 Census Substitute on TheGenealogist and they encompass a period currently not served by a published census. With this release the total records are boosted to 1.75 million heads of household.

Tomorrow is World Backup Day

I have written many times about the need for genealogists and most everyone else to make frequent backups of their important data, pictures, and videos. (See http://bit.ly/2pQTv6o for some of my past articles about the needs for backups.) Therefore, I will call your attention to the fact that April 1 (no fooling!) is World Backup Day.

Whatever else you may be reflecting on this weekend, take a moment to think about what you would do if you suddenly lost your genealogy data due to a software bug, malware, theft, fire, flood, or even (yes, it happens!) human error. Instead of storing it all in one place (like your computer), you keep another copy of everything somewhere safe.

Call for Proposals Deadline Extended for NGS 2019 Family History Conference

The following was written by the (U.S.) National Genealogical Society:

FALLS CHURCH, VA, 26 March 2018—NGS has extended the submission deadline for speakers—as well as organizations interested in sponsoring lectures—to submit lecture proposals for the National Genealogical Society (NGS) 2019 Family History Conference. All proposals must be submitted electronically at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/call_for_proposals 11:59 p.m. EDT on Friday, 6 April 2018.

The conference, Journey of Discovery, will be held in St. Charles, Missouri, 8-11 May 2019. Typically, this annual conference attracts between 1,800 to 2,000 family historians and genealogists as well as more than eighty exhibitors and sponsors. NGS promotes its conferences nationally and in regional markets as well as through online social media.

Where Old, Unreadable Documents go to be Understood

Where can you decipher that difficult-to-read document or letter found in your genealogy research? A transcriber on the Isle of Man can decipher almost anything.

According to an article by Sarah Laskow in the Atlas Obscura web site:

“On any given day, from her home on the Isle of Man, Linda Watson might be reading a handwritten letter from one Confederate soldier to another, or a list of convicts transported to Australia. Or perhaps she is reading a will, a brief from a long-forgotten legal case, an original Jane Austen manuscript. Whatever is in them, these documents made their way to her because they have one thing in common: They’re close to impossible to read.

On the Road Again

This is a quick notice to let you know there may not be as many articles as normal posted in this newsletter in the next few days. I am presently in a hotel room in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from now through the end of the week. I am attending the annual conference of the Federation of Genealogical Societies. See http://bit.ly/2vZWqM0 and https://www.fgsconference.org for details about the conference.

I hope to write about the conference events that I see and attend. Stay tuned!

Ancestry Insider Is Shutting Down

Another blog bites the dust. (Or is it “bytes the dust?”) The Ancestry Insider blog provided an unofficial, unauthorized view of Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org for more than ten years. You can read the announcement at: http://www.ancestryinsider.org/2017/05/a-fond-farewell.html.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

There are over 7.6 million new records available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

United States Marriages

Over 6.7 million new additions covering 127 counties across 18 states have been added to our collection of United States Marriages. The release includes significant updates for the states of Georgia, Maine, North Carolina, Ohio and Oregon and marks the latest step in Findmypast’s efforts to create the single largest online collection of U.S. marriage records in history.

The records include transcripts and images of the original documents that list marriage date, the names of the bride and groom, birthplace, birth date, age, residence as well as fathers’ and mothers’ names.

Devon, Parish Registers Browse