Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) The 1890 U.S. Census: Not Everything Was Destroyed

MyHeritage Expands to Health; Launches New DNA Test Offering Powerful and Personalized Health Insights for Consumers

Pssst! Want to Buy Your Family’s Coat of Arms?

GRAMPS and Other Genealogy Programs in the Cloud

Another Method of Sending Large Files to Others

Are You Unknowingly Forfeiting Your Genetic Privacy Rights?

(+) The 1890 U.S. Census: Not Everything Was Destroyed

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

Beginning U.S. genealogists soon learn that the 1890 census records were destroyed in a fire in the basement of the Commerce Building on January 10, 1921. Many people who would like to see these records just shrug their shoulders and move on.

Some of the 1890 census records after being damaged by fire and water.

A short search on the Web, however, soon reveals that not all of the records were destroyed. In fact, census fragments for 1890 in Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, South Dakota, Texas, and the District of Columbia survived and are available now.

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

United Kingdom, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Minnesota, North Carolina, and Oregon

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

MyHeritage Expands to Health; Launches New DNA Test Offering Powerful and Personalized Health Insights for Consumers

MyHeritage today announced the MyHeritage DNA Health + Ancestry test, a major expansion of its DNA product line. The following is the announcement:

The new MyHeritage DNA Health + Ancestry test provides comprehensive health reports for conditions affected by genetics including heart disease, breast cancer, type 2 diabetes, and Alzheimer’s disease

Tel Aviv, Israel & Lehi, Utah — MyHeritage, the leading global service for family history and DNA testing, announced today a major expansion of its DNA product line with the launch of the MyHeritage DNA Health + Ancestry test. The test provides a new dimension of genetic insight with comprehensive health reports that can empower future health and lifestyle choices. It is a superset of the current MyHeritage DNA Ancestry-Only test, and includes its pillar features: a percentage breakdown of ethnic origins and matching to relatives through shared DNA. MyHeritage is now the only global consumer DNA company to offer an extensive health and ancestry product in over 40 languages.

The launch of the Health + Ancestry product distinguishes MyHeritage as the only major service that bridges consumers’ past, present, and future: MyHeritage’s integrated suite of products enable users to discover their family history and ethnic origins, find new relatives, and receive valuable insights to help manage choices regarding their health that may impact their future well-being.

Pssst! Want to Buy Your Family’s Coat of Arms?

CoatOfArmsIn many shopping malls across America, you will see pushcart vendors selling reproductions of coats of arms, claiming to be the “proud history and heritage of your family name” or similar words. These merchants sell coats of arms on parchment paper, suitable for framing. They also may sell coats of arms on t-shirts, sweatshirts, golf jerseys, stationery, coffee mugs or even key chains.

Similar “businesses” exist on the Web. A number of Web sites proclaim that they can sell you “authentic” copies of your family’s coat of arms. One Web site says, “What is your Name? What was it’s origin? Was it taken from the name of a village? Was it taken from the Bible? A clan name? An Occupation? An ancient landmark? Who were your historical namesakes who bore your fine family name in the homeland of your ancestors?” Sometimes they also claim to sell “gifts of lasting heritage.”

I have one thing to say to these con artists: “Balderdash!”

Findmypast adds a Newly Created Collection of US Passenger & Crew Lists

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

    • Wide variety of over 100 million records covering more than 160 years of travel to the US now available to search in one place
    • Ship manifests, crew lists, flight manifests, passenger arrival lists and more, including over 2 million new records covering Boston, Texas and Carolina

Leading family history website, Findmypast, has today announced the creation of a new US travel and migration collection totalling more than 100 million records.

United States, Passenger and Crew Lists has been created by merging all of Findmypast’s existing US passenger and crew lists with over 2 million brand new records covering Boston, Texas and South Carolina.

Spanning over 160 years of travel, this vast national collection brings together records of passengers and crew who arrived in America by ship or by plane, from the East Coast to the West Coast, between 1800 and 1964.

23andMe Moves into Researching in Medical Data, not just DNA

According to an article by Christina Farr that has been published in the CNBC web site:

DNA-testing start-up 23andMe is experimenting with a new way to collect a lot more health data from millions of its users than just their DNA.

The company is now asking a subset of customers if they’d be willing to incorporate their lab results, prescription information and medical history, after they’ve received the results from the genetic test. 23andMe, which has sold about 10 million at-home DNA testing kits, will be able to access that data if users let the company connect outside medical providers using a third-party medical data network called Human API.

Another Method of Sending Large Files to Others

Sending large files, pictures, or videos to someone else or even to your yourself (for copying a file to another computer) has often been difficult. Sending files by email often is limited by the size of the file(s) to be sent. In the past, the only method of sending large files was by FTP file transfers or by questionable P2P (peer-to-peer) programs. Luckily, technology has moved on and today it is easy and cheap to send large files, such as family photographs, large GEDCOM files, and even videos of your grandchildren you want to share with other relatives.

Sharing files has long been easy for smaller files but with limitations. For instance, the various methods of sending files often have maximum file size limitations.

Next, sharing files by Dropbox is exactly that: sharing. While you can technically share files hosted on Dropbox, any edits or changes affect the file for all users. If someone uploads a file and a recipient then deletes it, the file is deleted for everyone.

A better solution has just been announced, called Dropbox Transfer.

Essex (England) Record Office Launches a New Searchable Index of the Essex Parish Registers

The Essex Record Office, working alongside Ancestry.com, have launched a new searchable index of the Essex parish registers. Searching for your Essex ancestors is now easier than ever, according to an article in he Essex Record Office’s Blog at: http://bit.ly/2NJUmUZ.

Parish register for St Mary the Virgin, Chelmsford.

My thanks to newsletter reader Holly Adams for telling me about this new online resource.

Wapello County (Iowa) Genealogy Society Plans to Move

The Wapello County Board of Supervisors are deciding whether to approve the Wapello County (Iowa) Genealogical Society’s desire to relocate from their present location to the Wapello County Historical Museum in Ottumwa.

Details may be found in a brief article by Chiara Romero in the Ottumwa Courier at http://bit.ly/2xDtBGJ.

Are You Unknowingly Forfeiting Your Genetic Privacy Rights?

From an article by Katherine M. Silverman, published in the Mondaq.com web site:

“The issue of genetic privacy is getting a lot of attention in the media lately, mainly due to the role DNA has played in identifying suspects in prominent “cold cases” like that of the Golden State Killer. But use of these “genetic genealogy” tools has raised concerns from privacy advocates who fear that genetic information shared on public genealogy databases could be misused. While “oversharing” personal information on social media has become par for the course, it’s important to think carefully about what information you’re publishing on the internet and who might have access to that information in the future.”

Also:

GRAMPS and Other Genealogy Programs in the Cloud

GRAMPS (an abbreviation for “Genealogy Research and Analysis Management Programming System”) was originally developed as a rather full-featured Linux genealogy program and later was ported to Macintosh, Windows, BSD UNIX and Solaris. GRAMPS is always available free of charge. (You can find my previous articles about GRAMPS by starting at https://goo.gl/gVUE9d.)

GRAMPS also has been available as a cloud-based program for some time. In theory, you should be able to use the cloud-based version of GRAMPS with any Android, Apple iOS (specifically iPad), Chromebook, Windows, Macintosh, or Linux computer. Since it runs from the cloud, no software installation in your computing device is required. Best of all, GRAMPS is available FREE of charge.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Are You Ready for the Future of Computing?

America Counts: Stories Behind the Numbers

ScanBee: A Scanner and Copier in Your iPhone

Another Update to Randy Majors’ Genealogy Mapping Web Site

Tennessee State Library & Archives Launches New Digital Project on Revolutionary War

(+) Are You Ready for the Future of Computing?

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

I am writing this article while seated at a desk in my home. I am staring at a large monitor on the desk and typing these words on a keyboard that sits on that desk. The keyboard is connected to a boxy-looking computer on my desk. This is how I use a computer most of the time. It is the same method that I used thirty-five years ago, in 1984.

This is modern technology?

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

United Kingdom, Maryland, and Tennessee

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

TheGenealogist announces the Availability of New Unique Searchable Parish Records

The following announcement was written by TheGenealogist.co.uk:

Some of the records reveal the parents of illegitimate children

TheGenealogist has released over half a million new parish records for Norfolk into their Parish Records collection. In addition to containing the uniquely transcribed records of Baptism, Marriages and Burials with images for over 250 parishes, these records also include some fascinating Bastardy bonds, Examinations, Warrants and Orders. With this release family historians will be able to find the details of ancestors baptised, married and buried as well as those that had children born out of wedlock in this East Anglian county.

The Outcast. Richard Redgrave

The new data will allow the family history researcher to discover:

New Records Available to Search this Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

Explore your early American roots this weekend with a selection of new additions, including:

British Officers Serving In Early America, 1614-1787

Explore six fascinating 19th century publications that record then names and details of British Army Officers serving in America prior to and during the Revolutionary War. These lists will allow you to discover your ancestor’s rank, regiment and details surrounding their service history. Each record is available in a PDF format.

Pennsylvania Immigrants, 1727-1776

Explore this 1856 publication which, in its own words, is a ‘A Collection of Upwards Of Thirty Thousand Names Of German, Swiss, Dutch, French And Other Immigrants In Pennsylvania From 1727 To 1776: With A Statement Of The Names Of Ships, Whence They Sailed, And The Date Of Their Arrival At Philadelphia, Chronology.’

America Counts: Stories Behind the Numbers

The following was written by the U.S. Census Bureau:

Registered United States Census Bureau Logo

America Counts: Stories Behind the Numbers

July 4th: Celebrating 243 Years of Independence

Celebrating 243 Years of Independence

As the nation celebrates this Independence Day, it’s a good time to reflect on how our Founding Fathers enshrined in our Constitution the importance of statistics as a vital tool for measuring people, places and economy.

Get the Stats

New Free Historical Records on FamilySearch: Week of 1 July 2019

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

FamilySearch added new, free, historical records this week from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, Italy, Peru, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, and the United States, including Arizona, California, Michigan, Montana, New Jersey, Oregon, and Pennsylvania.

Search these new records and images by clicking on the collection links below, or go to FamilySearch to search over 8 billion free names and record images.

ScanBee: A Scanner and Copier in Your iPhone

UPDATE: The article stated that “ScanBee for iPhones was a $3 US app. However, the price recently was dropped to zero.” A number of newsletter readers reported installing it as a FREE app. However, the new price of FREE was a short-term promotion that lasted for a few days. The price has since reverted back to $3 US (£2.99 in the UK, $4.99 in Australian dollars, $4.99 in New Zealand, $3.99 Canadian). Even at that price, I would consider it to be a bargain.

Your smartphone is one of the greatest tools available today. You can find thousands of apps that will perform all sorts of tasks. For genealogists, one of the more valuable tools is that of converting the smartphone into a scanner.

While I always think of genealogical uses for smartphone apps, the fact is that a scanner app in your phone can be used for dozens of other purposes. I scan all sorts of things: receipts, insurance documents, children’s report cards, menus from local take-out restaurants, automobile registrations, eyeglass prescriptions, recipes found in newspapers and magazines, and much, much more. I also have digitized my driver’s license and passport as well.

Numerous scanning apps are available for both iPhones and Android phones. A quick look in the phone’s app store will show several apps that convert your phone into a handheld scanner.

For the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, my favorite scanning app is ScanBee. ScanBee reportedly has been downloaded and installed more than 100,000 times. Users have rated ScanBee at 4.8 stars out of a maximum of 5 on the Apple App Store.