CanadianHeadstones.com now Exceeds 1.5 Million Records

canadian_headstones_logoThe folks at CanadianHeadstones.com (CH) sent a note announcing that the online web site has now surpassed 1.5 Million records. The announcement states, “CH was founded in 2009 as a completely FREE archive of headstone photographs. As a Canadian non-profit corporation, CH is staffed and controlled by unpaid-volunteer Directors. As a corporation, its longevity does not depend on a single person or private control. CH is the only fully Canadian site which indexes every name on the headstones, provides the complete transcription and is fully searchable on multiple levels including the text of the transcription.

“Hundreds of volunteers and volunteer groups are submitting over 800 records per day!”

You can learn more or even submit your own headstone photos for others to enjoy at http://www.CanadianHeadstones.com.

Staten Island Historical Newspapers Now Online

The New York Public Library just posted more than 9,000 pages from The Richmond County Advance online, covering the years 1886 to 1910. Find them at nypl.org/sinewspapers. This “NYPL Innovation Project” began with the scanning of the Advance from the collections of Historic Richmond Town. It is the largest batch of historical Staten Island papers ever posted to the Web — and it is changing the way we explore the Island’s past. The Advance joins the Richmond County Mirror online, which was previously posted by the New York Public Library.

best_ferru_rc_advance

Historical newspapers can be useful to many different people:

City Directories of Peterborough, Ontario are now Online

A collection of 115 Peterborough city and county directories, dating back to 1858, have been digitized. They’re now available online for anyone to search – for free – at https://archive.org/details/peterboroughcitydirectories.

vernonscityofpet1922vern

For years, city directories were published annually with lists of names, addresses and professions of people in a particular city. Look up your house address in a directory and you can see the names of those who lived there in that particular year. You can also look for your ancestors and other relatives who lived in Peterborough. Then you can look up the name of that person in the same directory – under a different section – to find out what that person did for a living.

Zoho Writer in the Cloud

If you already have a word processor installed in each of your computers and are happy with your present choice, you probably will want to skip this article. However, if you do not have a good word processor, or if you want to look at other possibilities, this may be the article for you. If you are presently using Google Docs or Microsoft Word Online or some other cloud-based word processor and are frustrated by your program’s lack of some features you want, this is the article for you. If you need a better word processor for sharing documents with co-workers or with family or even with genealogy society members, this is the article for you. If you want a good word processor for an iPad or Android tablet computer, this is the article for you.

Oh, by the way, this article describes a word processor that is FREE for personal use.

zoho_onlineZoho is an online Web service that lets you do almost anything online that you can do on a desktop computer, from creating documents to building a spreadsheet to managing a database, plus conferencing, project-management, chatting, and a dozen other functions. Zoho also duplicates many applications that Google offers with sophisticated calendars, spreadsheets, presentations, email and chat. In some cases, Zoho’s products may be more powerful than Google’s; but, in other cases, the opposite may be true. For this article, I will focus on one product called Zoho Writer.

Zoho Writer is an online word processor that is very easy to use. Yet it has most of the bells and whistles of an expensive, traditional word processor. I also find it to be much more powerful and useful than the word processor available with Google Docs.

Ancestry.com LLC Reports Second Quarter 2016 Financial Results

The following is an excerpt from Ancestry.com LLC’s Second Quarter 2016 Financial Results, as reported this afternoon:

Second Quarter Revenues of $211.4 million, Up 25% Year-Over-Year

AncestryDNA Database Now Includes More Than 2 Million Samples

LEHI, Utah, July 20, 2016 — Ancestry.com LLC (the “Company”), the leader in family history and consumer genomics, reported financial results today for the second quarter ended June 30, 2016.

“Ancestry’s performance continued to accelerate in the second quarter,” said Tim Sullivan, Chief Executive Officer of Ancestry. “The combined value proposition of our market-leading family history and DNA offerings has helped deliver over $750 million in revenue in the last four quarters. We are excited about the opportunities ahead and remain focused on execution and investing in the long-term growth of the company.”

Second Quarter 2016 Financial Highlights

Early Irish Marriage Index Reaches 80,000 Records

The following announcement was written by the folks at the Irish Genealogical Research Society:

The Irish Genealogical Research Society’s Early Irish Marriage Index has now been updated, with several thousand more records being added, all noted from obscure and underused sources. The database now holds reference to more than 80,000 marriages.

cat-d-015Combining the names of brides, grooms with the various relatives mentioned in the database, the Marriage Index now notes almost 177,000 named individuals. A good many of the latest batch were extrapolated from Index of Nuns, a CD publication in 2015 by the Catholic Family History Society, which notes biographical information for about 14,000 nuns, many of them from Ireland. For many, their date of birth and parents’ names are recorded, allowing for an approximation of the year by which their parents had married.

Newly Available Online: Marriage Notices Appearing in Troy, New York, Newspapers 1797 – 1860

The Troy Irish Genealogy Society (TIGS) has added yet another online database. (This has to be one busy genealogy society!) The following was written by the Troy Irish Genealogy Society:

An index to 6,177 marriage notices covering 12,354 names that were published in five different Troy, New York newspapers from 1797 to 1860 was created by staff at the Troy Public Library in 1938 through 1939. The Troy Irish Genealogy Society was allowed by the Troy Library to scan this book so these important records could be made available on-line for genealogy researchers.

To see these records go to the TIGS website – www.troyirish.com – click on PROJECTS and then, under Marriage Records, click on MARRIAGE NOTICES APPEARING IN TROY NEWSPAPERS.The five different Troy newspapers mentioned in the introduction to the index were:

A Call to Action! Finding the Fallen on July 30

This is a follow-up to the Join the Nationwide Service Project “Finding the Fallen” article I published at https://goo.gl/Vq0SAU on June 6. That article described a joint effort between BillionGraves and the Boy Scouts of America to honor of the veterans of the Armed Forces. Everyone is welcome to participate. This follow-up reminder was written by the folks at BillionGraves:

On July 30, 2016, in honor of the veterans of the Armed Forces, BillionGraves and the Boy Scouts of America will host the nationwide service project, Finding the Fallen. We are asking for everyone’s help to make this project a success! By joining the project, you will serve these heroes by photographing and logging the GPS locations of the headstones and markers in our national cemeteries and uploading them to the BillionGraves.com website.

To organize this commemorative event in your area, visit https://billiongraves.com/create-event/. Easy step by step instructions will guide you in selection of a National cemetery in your area and allow you to invite others to take part in this amazing project with you.

You will need to download the free Billiongraves app on your smart phone. https://billiongraves.com/mobile-device.

ABBYY FineScanner – a Document Scanner for Android and iPhone/iPad

Handheld devices grow more and more powerful every year. Now the mobile device in your hand can not only create digital images of documents and pages from a book, it also can even perform OCR (optical character recognition) that converts the printed words into computer-readable and editable text. This should be a very useful tool for genealogists, historians, and anyone else who does a lot of research and needs to save much of the information found.

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A scan from the Redbook. Click on the image to view a larger version. Your image viewing program in your computer should allow you to zoom in or out as needed and also to print.

Does This Photograph Belong to Your Family?

Olympia_photo

A woman rummaging through a box of post cards at an Olympia, Washington, flea market found a one-of-a-kind treasure Sunday: a beaming young couple captured in a black-and-white photograph. Kresta Duncan said she has no idea who it belongs to, but would love to reunite the photo with its rightful owners.

GenTeam adds Records from the old Austro-Hungarian Empire

logo-genteam

GenTeam is a European online genealogy service for historians and genealogists who work independently or as a team on databases. All data at GenTeam is available free of charge. The use of GenTeam also requires no membership fee. The collection currently contains 14,409,435 entries and will be continually updated. GenTeam recently added:

Preserving Medieval Graffiti

st-georgeWe have all read about the Middle Ages, right? A time of kings, princes, knights and fair damsels in distress. It is a vision of the past that includes the splendor of great cathedrals and the brooding darkness of mighty castles. A past of banquets and battles.

There’s only one thing wrong with that vision: 95% of the people were not a part of it.

Most men, women and children were commoners. 95 per cent of the population performed about 99% of the work. This undoubtedly includes your ancestors and mine.

We rarely read about the 95% of the population who were common people. With low levels of literacy throughout much of the Middle Ages, these people did not leave written records behind. The few texts that described the common people were actually written and compiled by the priests, scribes and lawyers of the elite. They refer to the lower orders, but are most certainly not in their own words. However, many of these common folks did leave something written behind: graffiti.

MyHeritage Introduces New SuperSearch Alerts

MyHeritage has just launched a new feature — SuperSearch™ Alerts — that repeats previous searches that MyHeritage users have made in SuperSearch and seeks new results that did not exist at the time of the original search.

When MyHeritage finds new results for those previous searches, the company will send you an email message with links to view the records, and if you’d like, you can save it to your family tree, extract information to the relevant people in your family tree, or add new individuals to your tree.

SuperSearch-Alerts

SuperSearch Alerts works automatically in the background ensuring that you won’t miss new records that have been added to MyHeritage’s collections that are relevant to your past searches. As stated in the MyHeritage Blog:

New Genealogical Databases to Determine Family Cancer

The use of large family history databases to determine a person’s likelihood of developing cancer has been well received in a recent study – and further trials should be conducted to see if their use is possible in Britain and other countries, according to a new research paper co-authored by a Plymouth University academic.

Heather Skirton, Professor of Health Genetics, worked alongside Vigdis Stefansdottir from Landspitali – the National University Hospital of Iceland to carry out a study on 19 participants in focus groups in Iceland.

Episcopal Diocese of Utah Database of Indexed Parish Records is Now Online

The Episcopal Diocese of Utah made available a database of indexed parish records from it’s no longer functioning congregations in Utah. Besides being a project associated with the Utah State Historical Records Advisory Board, it is also an informal kick-off to the Diocese’s sesquicentennial in 2017. It is hoped that besides documenting the Episcopal Church in Utah it may also be of use to genealogists with other than LDS Utah roots and those whose ancestors may have physically followed mining in the western United States.

The initial database covers the years 1870 to 1975 and records individuals in Arthur, Brigham City, Castle Gate, Corinne, Dugway, East Garfield (now known as Magna), Eureka, Frisco, Garfield, Helper, Kelton, Kenilworth, Layton, Logan, Myton, Provo, Roosevelt, Silver Reef, Standardville, Terra, and Vernal (some of which are now authentic ghost towns).

Book Review: Tracing Your Irish Ancestors

The following book review was written by Bobbi King:

Tracing Your Irish AncestorsTracing Your Irish Ancestors
by John Grenham. Genealogical Publishing Co. 2012. 579 pages.

My cousin does a lot of Irish research, she says the online records these days are terrific resources for finding family members.

But we both agree, a solid foundation rooted in the basic concepts of Irish research is a must before believing that the internet is going to give you all your answers in resolving your genealogical problems.

This is the fourth edition of Tracing Your Irish Ancestors. John Grenham seems exactly the right person to consult for authoritative information on the topic. He publishes his “Irish Roots” blog, has published numerous volumes on Irish research, and describes this edition as reflecting “the profound change in the connection between Irish research and the internet…the internet is at the heart of any Irish family history research project, and the entire edition has been rewritten to incorporate that change. Where online transcripts exist, these are listed alongside the descriptions of the original records, and research strategies are supplied for any major dedicated websites.”

You Will Soon Be Able to Run Windows Programs on a Chromebook

I have written a number of times about Chromebooks, the low-cost laptop computers that boot up quickly, are simple to use, never get viruses, and perform the computer tasks that many computer owners want. (Go to https://goo.gl/TsSWQ5 to find my earlier Chromebook articles.) These $150 to $300 laptop computers have become very popular. Now they may become even more popular than ever.

The developers of CrossOver, a utility that allows users to run Windows programs on Linux, have been working on an Android app that does the same thing, bringing Windows apps to the Android OS. Doing so allows Windows programs to run on Google’s new Android interface for Chromebooks. The official app hasn’t been released yet. However, the company has recently posted a video showing the Steam game client and Windows game Limbo running on an Acer Chromebook R11.

Over 2.2 Million New Records from across the UK Available to Search this Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by the folks at Findmypast:

Findmypast_logoThis week’s Findmypast Friday marks the release of two brand new collections, over 1.8 million new historic British newspaper articles and updates to six existing sets.

Worcestershire Monumental Inscriptions

Explore centuries of monumental inscriptions from 178 different parishes. This brand new set contains 85,847 records, including one for UK prime minister Stanley Baldwin. The detail in each transcript can vary, especially as over the centuries many of these monuments have been damaged by weather, exposure and, in some cases, vandalism. Most will include a name, death year, any relevant places and a link to purchase the full inscription.

Aberdeenshire, Banffshire & Kincardineshire Monumental Inscriptions

Who Do You Think You Are? to return to BBC One

WhodoyouthinkyouarelogoThe genealogy show, Who Do You Think You Are?, will return to BBC One screens this autumn for its thirteenth series. EastEnders actor Danny Dyer, Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden, star of film and stage Sir Ian McKellen, news presenter Sophie Raworth, The Royle Family actor Ricky Tomlinson, Star Wars and Harry Potter actor Warwick Davis, presenter Liz Bonnin, actor and comedian Greg Davies, actress Sunetra Sarker and popstar Cheryl all discover their past in this year’s series.

You can read the details in the ATV Today web site at http://www.atvtoday.co.uk/82246-bbc/.

(+) Calculating Birth Dates from Death Date Information

The following is a Plus Edition article, written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

What day was that ancestor born? It seems like such a simple question, and yet finding the answer can be surprisingly complex, even when you have the numbers in front of you. Exact dates are often found in death certificates and frequently on tombstones. The problem is that these are often written as death dates followed by the person’s age at death.

George_Eastman_tombstone

Here is a common example:

George Eastman
Died June 12, 1899
Aged 83 years, 10 months, 26 days

How do you tell George Eastman’s date of birth? You obviously need to subtract 83 years and 10 months and 26 days from the date of death. Simple, right? Well, not as simple as it first appears.

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