Are You Unknowingly Forfeiting Your Genetic Privacy Rights?

From an article by Katherine M. Silverman, published in the Mondaq.com web site:

“The issue of genetic privacy is getting a lot of attention in the media lately, mainly due to the role DNA has played in identifying suspects in prominent “cold cases” like that of the Golden State Killer. But use of these “genetic genealogy” tools has raised concerns from privacy advocates who fear that genetic information shared on public genealogy databases could be misused. While “oversharing” personal information on social media has become par for the course, it’s important to think carefully about what information you’re publishing on the internet and who might have access to that information in the future.”

Also:

GRAMPS and Other Genealogy Programs in the Cloud

GRAMPS (an abbreviation for “Genealogy Research and Analysis Management Programming System”) was originally developed as a rather full-featured Linux genealogy program and later was ported to Macintosh, Windows, BSD UNIX and Solaris. GRAMPS is always available free of charge. (You can find my previous articles about GRAMPS by starting at https://goo.gl/gVUE9d.)

GRAMPS also has been available as a cloud-based program for some time. In theory, you should be able to use the cloud-based version of GRAMPS with any Android, Apple iOS (specifically iPad), Chromebook, Windows, Macintosh, or Linux computer. Since it runs from the cloud, no software installation in your computing device is required. Best of all, GRAMPS is available FREE of charge.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

(+) Are You Ready for the Future of Computing?

America Counts: Stories Behind the Numbers

ScanBee: A Scanner and Copier in Your iPhone

Another Update to Randy Majors’ Genealogy Mapping Web Site

Tennessee State Library & Archives Launches New Digital Project on Revolutionary War

(+) Are You Ready for the Future of Computing?

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

I am writing this article while seated at a desk in my home. I am staring at a large monitor on the desk and typing these words on a keyboard that sits on that desk. The keyboard is connected to a boxy-looking computer on my desk. This is how I use a computer most of the time. It is the same method that I used thirty-five years ago, in 1984.

This is modern technology?

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

United Kingdom, Maryland, and Tennessee

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

TheGenealogist announces the Availability of New Unique Searchable Parish Records

The following announcement was written by TheGenealogist.co.uk:

Some of the records reveal the parents of illegitimate children

TheGenealogist has released over half a million new parish records for Norfolk into their Parish Records collection. In addition to containing the uniquely transcribed records of Baptism, Marriages and Burials with images for over 250 parishes, these records also include some fascinating Bastardy bonds, Examinations, Warrants and Orders. With this release family historians will be able to find the details of ancestors baptised, married and buried as well as those that had children born out of wedlock in this East Anglian county.

The Outcast. Richard Redgrave

The new data will allow the family history researcher to discover:

New Records Available to Search this Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

Explore your early American roots this weekend with a selection of new additions, including:

British Officers Serving In Early America, 1614-1787

Explore six fascinating 19th century publications that record then names and details of British Army Officers serving in America prior to and during the Revolutionary War. These lists will allow you to discover your ancestor’s rank, regiment and details surrounding their service history. Each record is available in a PDF format.

Pennsylvania Immigrants, 1727-1776

Explore this 1856 publication which, in its own words, is a ‘A Collection of Upwards Of Thirty Thousand Names Of German, Swiss, Dutch, French And Other Immigrants In Pennsylvania From 1727 To 1776: With A Statement Of The Names Of Ships, Whence They Sailed, And The Date Of Their Arrival At Philadelphia, Chronology.’

America Counts: Stories Behind the Numbers

The following was written by the U.S. Census Bureau:

Registered United States Census Bureau Logo

America Counts: Stories Behind the Numbers

July 4th: Celebrating 243 Years of Independence

Celebrating 243 Years of Independence

As the nation celebrates this Independence Day, it’s a good time to reflect on how our Founding Fathers enshrined in our Constitution the importance of statistics as a vital tool for measuring people, places and economy.

Get the Stats

New Free Historical Records on FamilySearch: Week of 1 July 2019

The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

FamilySearch added new, free, historical records this week from Australia, Belgium, Canada, England, Italy, Peru, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, and the United States, including Arizona, California, Michigan, Montana, New Jersey, Oregon, and Pennsylvania.

Search these new records and images by clicking on the collection links below, or go to FamilySearch to search over 8 billion free names and record images.

ScanBee: A Scanner and Copier in Your iPhone

UPDATE: The article stated that “ScanBee for iPhones was a $3 US app. However, the price recently was dropped to zero.” A number of newsletter readers reported installing it as a FREE app. However, the new price of FREE was a short-term promotion that lasted for a few days. The price has since reverted back to $3 US (£2.99 in the UK, $4.99 in Australian dollars, $4.99 in New Zealand, $3.99 Canadian). Even at that price, I would consider it to be a bargain.

Your smartphone is one of the greatest tools available today. You can find thousands of apps that will perform all sorts of tasks. For genealogists, one of the more valuable tools is that of converting the smartphone into a scanner.

While I always think of genealogical uses for smartphone apps, the fact is that a scanner app in your phone can be used for dozens of other purposes. I scan all sorts of things: receipts, insurance documents, children’s report cards, menus from local take-out restaurants, automobile registrations, eyeglass prescriptions, recipes found in newspapers and magazines, and much, much more. I also have digitized my driver’s license and passport as well.

Numerous scanning apps are available for both iPhones and Android phones. A quick look in the phone’s app store will show several apps that convert your phone into a handheld scanner.

For the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, my favorite scanning app is ScanBee. ScanBee reportedly has been downloaded and installed more than 100,000 times. Users have rated ScanBee at 4.8 stars out of a maximum of 5 on the Apple App Store.

Tennessee State Library & Archives Launches New Digital Project on Revolutionary War

Here is a quote from an announcement at https://sos.tn.gov/news/state-library-archives-launches-new-digital-project-revolutionary-war:

“As our nation prepares to celebrate Independence Day, the Tennessee State Library & Archives has launched Patriot Paths, a new project that uses Revolutionary War pension records to map the paths that these soldiers took before and after their service. The project, which is still in progress, was unveiled by State Librarian and Archivist Chuck Sherrill at the National Genealogical Society’s recent annual convention.

Another Update to Randy Majors’ Genealogy Mapping Web Site

Randy Majors continues to improve his great mapping site that is useful to genealogist and to many others as well. The maps on that site have shown county lines for some time but only displayed the NAME of one county at a time. That has now been changed to show all the names of all the counties being displayed.

You can read about the latest update at https://www.randymajors.com/2019/07/show-me-all-of-names.html.

Plus Edition Newsletter Has Been Sent

To all Plus Edition subscribers:

A notice of the latest EOGN Plus Edition newsletter was sent to you a few minutes ago. Here are the articles in this week’s Plus Edition newsletter:

Happy Canada Day!

(+) Enjoy Internet Access Nearly Anywhere and Anytime with a Personal Wi-Fi Hotspot

The Paperless Genealogist

RSS Newsfeeds Explained

David Mishkin, R.I.P.

Beware of the Websites Selling Fake DNA Kits

U.S. Supreme Court Blocks 2020 Census Citizenship Query

The Legal Power of Genealogy in Colonial America

(+) Enjoy Internet Access Nearly Anywhere and Anytime with a Personal Wi-Fi Hotspot

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman.

One of the phrases we often read in technical articles these days is “Internet everywhere.” Indeed, wi-fi Internet connections, often called “hotspots,” are available at thousands of coffee shops, restaurants, libraries, schools, and dozens of other places as well. I have successfully connected online from fast food burger places and while riding at 34,000 feet in an airplane However, despite the phrase “Internet everywhere,” we still cannot connect online from anywhere. A few places do not have wi-fi networks. And then there is the universal question: what do we do during power failures?

The answer is simple: anyone can connect to the Internet from almost anywhere by providing their own wireless modem, or “personal hotspot,” that connects to a cell tower within a few miles. It even works during power failures, as proven yesterday and today in my neighborhood.

So how do you connect a wi-fi equipped laptop, tablet, or other computing device to a cellular tower? There are two popular solutions.

The Paperless Genealogist

Too many genealogists are addicted to paper. In this day and age, that’s sad. I have no statistics about the amount of paper, ink, and toner consumed by genealogists every year, but I am sure we spend hundreds of thousands of dollars purchasing printers, paper, and supplies. That’s a huge waste of money, in my opinion. I wonder how many filing cabinets are sold to genealogists for in-home use. I will suggest there is a better way to store personal copies of genealogy records and related information.

The “paperless office” was an early prediction made in the June 30, 1975, issue of BusinessWeek. The article quoted George E. Pake, then head of Xerox Corp.’s Palo Alto (California) Research Center:

Recent Updates to the Calendar of Genealogy Events

The following pages have recently been updated in the Calendar of Genealogy Events:

California, Connecticut, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Vermont, and Virginia

Some of the above changes may have been deletions of past events.

All information in the Calendar of Events is contributed by YOU and by other genealogists. You can directly add information to the Calendar about your local genealogy event.

Unsung Heroes Awards – 3rd Quarter Nominations Being Accepted

The following announcement was written by the Genealogy Guys, George G. Morgan and Drew Smith:

Genealogy Guys and Vivid-Pix Announce Genealogy’s Unsung Heroes Awards – Nominations Being Accepted for 3Q2019

The Genealogy Guys, George G. Morgan and Drew Smith, co-hosts and producers of the oldest continually produced genealogy podcast, and Rick Voight and Randy Fredlund, the principals of Vivid-Pix, makers of RESTORE photo and document restoration software, today announce the continuation of their activities to acknowledge and celebrate those members of the genealogy community who digitize, index, or transcribe photos and documents of value to genealogical researchers. The Unsung Heroes Awards is a quarterly awards program designed to recognize its recipients in five categories: individuals, genealogical/historical societies, libraries/archives, young people, and a new posthumous certificate award.

16 Gigabytes of Wikipedia Saved onto DNA Strands to Demonstrate New Storage Tech

From an article by Stephen Shankland in the C|Net web site:

“Computer storage technology has moved from wires with magnets to hard disks to 3D stacks of memory chips. But the next storage technology might use an approach as old as life on earth: DNA. Startup Catalog announced Friday it’s crammed all of the text of Wikipedia’s English-language version onto the same genetic molecules our own bodies use.

“It accomplished the feat with its first DNA writer, a machine that would fit easily in your house if you first got rid of your refrigerator, oven and some counter space. And although it’s not likely to push aside your phone’s flash memory chips anytime soon, the company believes it’s useful already to some customers who need to archive data.”

It is the First Day of the Month: Back Up Your Genealogy Files

BackUpYourGenealogyFilesIt is the first day of the month. It’s time to back up your genealogy files. Then test your backups!

Actually, you can make backups at any time. However, it is easier and safer if you have a specific schedule. The first day of the month is easy to remember, so I would suggest you back up your genealogy files at least on the first day of every month, if not more often.

Massachusetts Bird’s-Eye View Historical Maps Are Now Online

If you are researching Massachusetts ancestors from the late 1800s through early 1900s, you will want to know about this announcement from the Massachusetts State Library:

The State Library has a large collection of bird’s-eye view maps that were digitized and are now available online! These maps illustrate with great detail aerial views of cities and towns in Massachusetts–much like what you can imagine a bird would see flying overhead!–with a few maps from other areas outside of Massachusetts. The online collection includes 120 maps so far, with many more to be added in the near future. Most maps date from the late 1800s up to the early 1900s.