Registration is Open For the 2017 APG Professional Management Conference

The following announcement was written by the Association of Professional Genealogists:

The Association of Professional Genealogists is pleased to announce the opening of registration for the 2017 Professional Management Conference to be held 29 September through 1 October at the DoubleTree by Hilton-Crystal City in Arlington, Virginia. Here is the link: https://www.apgen.org/conferences/index.html.

WHY ATTEND THE PMC?

The Professional Management Conference is the one conference dedicated to the needs of professional genealogists, providing education on business topics as well as advanced genealogical education on unique record sets, methodology, DNA, and more. The conference offers three tracks over three days with classes, workshops, poster sessions, and discussion groups–all conveniently located in the conference hotel, the DoubleTree by Hilton-Crystal City, Arlington, VA.

Announcing c3 Heirlooms – a Web Server App for Recording the History of Family Heirlooms

Did you inherit any family heirlooms that have been passed down from generation to generation? If so, you need to record and preserve the history of each piece as you know it to make sure the history does not get lost for future generations. In fact, some history may have already been lost before the items came into your possession. You owe it to future generations to preserve whatever historical information you may have.

Scott Hampton, the creator of c3 Heirlooms, states on his web site:

“c3 Heirlooms was created to stop that trend and allow you and your family to easily record your heirlooms and their history. I created this because our family needed it. Maybe yours could use it as well.”

Some features are:

National Genealogical Society Announces The 2017 Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship

The following announcement was written by the (U.S.) National Genealogical Society:

ARLINGTON, VA, 9 MAY 2017— Larry W. Cates is the 2017 recipient of the Filby Award for Genealogical Librarianship. Cates, who is librarian at the Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library, High Point, North Carolina, received his award and its $1,000 prize, which is underwritten by ProQuest, at the Librarians’ Day event of National Genealogical Society (NGS) 2017 Family History Conference in Raleigh, North Carolina., also underwritten by ProQuest. The Filby Award is named for the late P. William Filby, former director of the Maryland Historical Society and author of many core genealogical reference tools that genealogists have relied on for decades. Created in 1999 by NGS, the award has been sponsored by ProQuest and Mr. William Forsyth since 2006.

Cates has been Librarian at the Heritage Research Center of the High Point Public Library since October 2007. During the course of his career, he has created innovative programs for family historians. In 2010, Cates co-founded the Heritage Book Club to introduce genealogists to the historical context in which their ancestors lived. He initiated a “Field Trip to Archives” program with the Guilford County Genealogical Society to mentor inexperienced researchers. He also has provided programs to local genealogical societies; served as journal editor for the Randolph County Genealogical Society and Guilford County Genealogical Society; and helped to promote their activities through his library’s mailing list and at genealogy fairs at his library.

Follow-Up: Things You Don’t See Anymore

On December 14, 2015, I published an article at http://bit.ly/2qGwZin, Things You Don’t See Anymore. I described a number of things that used to be common in American life but have since almost disappeared. I listed a bunch of things, including “rotary telephones” and “telephone party lines.” I guess it is now time to update that list.

If I was to republish the list today, I would have to add “wired telephones.”

An article in the BBC News web site points out one major change in the past decade: the number of U.S. homes that have an old-fashioned, wired telephone obtained from the local telephone company has now dropped to less than 50%. That is a number that few people would have dreamed of ten years ago.

Google Streetview is Used to find Britain’s “Lost” 1930s-era Cycleways

You have to love technology, especially when it is used to study the history of the days before the technology was invented. One recent example is using Google Streetview to find miles and miles of “lost” British cycleways.

The Mickleham Bypass in Surrey

The following is an excerpt from an announcement from Carlton Reid:

The Lenovo Chromebook is Now Just $129

NOTE: The following article has nothing to do with genealogy. If you are looking for genealogy-related articles, I suggest you skip this one.

I have written a number of times about the usefulness of the low-cost Chromebook laptops. (My past articles about Chromebooks may be found by starting at: http://bit.ly/2pm21Iu.) I use my Chromebook more or less daily. It also has become my primary traveling computer and I also often use it from the living room couch whenever that is convenient.

While Chromebooks are cheaper than most any other laptops, WalMart is now offering an even lower price than I have seen before: $129. The Lenovo N22 Chromebook isn’t a used or refurbished system; it is brand-new and comes with a full warranty. The WalMart web site doesn’t say anything about a sale or a “special price” so I assume this is the regular price. Other web sites sell it for $150 to $200.

If you were thinking of picking up a Chromebook for yourself or for a family member, now might be the time. You can have it shipped to you or you can pick it up in person at a nearby WalMart store.

Georgia State Archives Digitizes Thousands of Confederate Muster Rolls and Places Them Online

The Georgia State Archives’ web site now contains digital images of the previously microfilmed Record Groups 22-1-63, Defense Dept., Adjutant General, Confederate Muster Rolls. The contents include the majority of the company muster rolls in this series are from military organizations created by the State of Georgia during the Civil War for service within the state. These military organizations include the Georgia Army (1861), the Georgia State Guards (August 1863-February 1864), and the Georgia State Line (1862-1865). The Georgia Militia is referred to as Georgia State Troops. Some units were later turned over to Confederate service. There are also nearly 250 muster rolls from Georgia Volunteer Infantry.

Please note these are not records for all Confederate troops from Georgia. It lists only the “military organizations created by the State of Georgia during the Civil War for service within the state.”

Each record of the muster roll includes:

(+) Essential Things I Never Travel Without – Part #2

The following is a Plus Edition article written by and copyright by Dick Eastman. 

As I explained in Part #1 of this article (still available at http://eogn.com/wp/?p=43332), I have become a fanatic on lightweight packing. I travel often and have too much “history” of dragging heavy luggage through airports as well as in and out of shuttle buses, taxis, hotel lobbies, through the snow or other inclement weather. As I get older, the muscles start to deteriorate as well. I used to carry a 50-pound suitcase without difficulty. I don’t ever want to do that again!

Even worse is the finances. U.S. airlines are now gouging their customers for every dollar they can get away with. US-based airlines collected over $4.1 billion in checked bag fees in 2016. (Reference: https://thepointsguy.com/2017/05/airline-baggage-fees-2016/) Yes, that’s “billions” with a “B.” Who paid these billions of dollars? Hapless travelers who didn’t know how to travel light.

Of course, that’s not the only price gouging that is going on. Now the passengers have to pay for food on the plane and it usually is nearly inedible food at that. Some airlines want to charge to put a single bag in the overhead bins. Then these same airlines advertise “the friendly skies” and other crap so that we have the “privilege” of being being packed in like sardines with shoulders overlapping. “Never have so many paid so much for so little.”

The New York Public Library has Released a Maps by Decade Tool

The New York Public Library has been creating some amazing digital tools in the past couple of years. The library wants more of its collection to be available to anyone with a computer or hand-held device, so it’s been digitizing its old maps and photos and presenting them in ways that make it easy for people accustomed to Google Maps and Streetview. In fact, its eventual goal is to allow people to travel back in time as if Google Maps had existed since the 19th century.

Last month, the library unveiled a Maps By Decade tool that lets people place old maps over the current street grid, and search by decade and neighborhood. They had made similar tools available before but never with this kind of handy decade-by-decade design.

Getting a Whiff of History – Do You Like the Smell of Old Books?

Most long-time genealogists know the smell of old books. Now a new study in the journal Heritage Science, claims that the odors of the past are part of our “cultural heritage.”

Old books (specifically the historic paper and other materials used) give off unique moldy or sweetly musty scents that readers and history buffs know intimately and find pleasurable.

Reading a digital image of an old book on Google Books just isn’t the same!

Minneapolis Star Tribune Newspapers Since 1867 are now Digitized and Available Online

Until now, archives from The Minneapolis Tribune and The Minneapolis Star, which merged in 1982, weren’t all available in one place. Now, the Star Tribune has digitized more than 54,000 issues from the past 150 years.

The Star Tribune is giving away free PDFs of any front page from the archives right now. Getting to click through the past isn’t free, though. Access for 30 days costs $7.99, and a six-month subscription costs $29.95. The archives were digitized with underwriting from Thomson Reuters and in partnership with newspapers.com.

You can learn more in an article at http://bit.ly/2qM5PTw while the collection itself is available at https://startribune.newspapers.com.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

There are over 7.6 million new records available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

United States Marriages

Over 6.7 million new additions covering 127 counties across 18 states have been added to our collection of United States Marriages. The release includes significant updates for the states of Georgia, Maine, North Carolina, Ohio and Oregon and marks the latest step in Findmypast’s efforts to create the single largest online collection of U.S. marriage records in history.

The records include transcripts and images of the original documents that list marriage date, the names of the bride and groom, birthplace, birth date, age, residence as well as fathers’ and mothers’ names.

Devon, Parish Registers Browse

Findmypast Add 6.7 Million Exclusive Records to their United States Marriages Collection

The following announcement was written by Findmypast:

New Additions Cover 127 Counties Across 18 States

5th May 2017

Leading family history website, Findmypast , has announced today the release of an additional 6.7 million United States Marriage records in partnership with Family Search International.

Covering 127 counties across 18 states, the new additions mark the latest step in Findmypast’s efforts to create the largest single online collection of U.S. marriage records in history. The collection was first launched in February 2016 and has received regular monthly updates ever since.

Legacy Tree Genealogists Earns SBA Business Award

In genealogy business news, Legacy Tree Genealogists, a Utah genealogy research firm specializing in custom family history services, has been selected as the Small Business Administration Woman-Owned Business of the Year, and will be honored at an awards ceremony May 24.

“Legacy Tree Genealogists was among a competitive field of deserving applications,” said Small Business Administration spokesperson Siobhan Carlisle. “Legacy Tree stood out during the selection process because of its sustained growth in the genealogy field, for its peer-to-peer support within that community and its dedication to a high standard of personal service to its world-wide customers.”

Who Do You Think You Are? Live! Conference to Cease

Sad news. One of my favorite genealogy conferences will not be held again. The Who Do You Think You Are? Live! conference that was held every year is shutting down. This is the conference that was held lately in Birmingham, England, although in earlier years it was held in London.

NOTE: This has nothing to do with the Who Do You Think You Are? television programs that appear to be very successful in a number of countries. Only the 3-day, in-person conference is being terminated.

You can read more in the Who Do You Think You Are? magazine at: http://bit.ly/2pZQe6l

The following announcement was released today by the Society of Genealogists:

National Library of Ireland Genealogy Service 2017 Renewed with Ancestor Network and Eneclann

The following announcement was written by the National Library of Ireland:

Dublin, Wednesday, 3 May 2017

Ancestor Network and Eneclann have been awarded the tender to support the genealogy advisory service with the National Library of Ireland in 2017.

This is the 6th year these leading Irish genealogy firms are partnering with the NLI to provide this unique genealogy service.

Visiting researchers to the NLI can avail of the advice of professional genealogists from Monday to Friday, 9:30am to 5:00pm.  The professional genealogists advise and assist on sources available at the NLI and other repositories as well as online resources.  They are also available to respond to enquiries via email, telephone or by letter.

A Report from the New England Regional Genealogical Consortium’s 2017 Conference

NOTE: I took a lot of photographs of this year’s NERGC conference. Most of them are available in an online photo album. Scroll down to see the photographs.

The 14th annual New England Regional Genealogical Conference was held last week (26-29 April 2017) in Springfield, Massachusetts. I was lucky enough to attend the conference and must say that I enjoyed it. I think all the other conference attendees enjoyed themselves as well. I have attended most of the NERGC conferences in the past ten or fifteen years and must say this was one of the best, perhaps the best, one that I ever saw. The theme of this year’s conference was Using The Tools Of Today & Tomorrow To Understand The Past.

This year’s conference was the biggest New England Regional Genealogical Conference (NERGC) conference ever held. More than 1,000 people registered for the conference even before the doors opened. A few more were “last minute walk-ins” who registered at the conference. I never heard the final attendance numbers but it obviously was more than 1,000 people. Not bad for a regional genealogy conference! I have been to some national conferences in past years that were smaller than that.

Watch the British Library Digitize One of the World’s Largest Books

Most experienced genealogists are familiar with over-sized books. Vital records, deeds, maps, and more are often published on larger-than-normal pages. Digitizing those books can be a challenge although several companies have already done a great job at digitization.

However, how do you digitize a book that is nearly six feet by seven and a half feet when open? It is so big that it even has wheels fixed onto it to make it easier to move around!

Santa Rosa County, Florida, Will Open a New Genealogy Library

The Santa Rosa County (Florida) Library System is officially opening its genealogy library on Monday. The building, located at 6275 Dogwood Drive (north on State Route 87) in Milton, Florida, is located down the hall from the county library system administration offices. It holds a variety of resources — printed material and digital — to help people investigate their family history.

The collection includes books, journals, microfilm, microfiche, obituaries, magazine and files of clippings from Santa Rosa County and beyond. The most extensive part of the information covers Florida, Georgia and Alabama.

Announcing the Release of GedSite version 1.5.1

This is a major upgrade to one of the best products for making web sites based on your genealogy data. The following announcement was written by Family History Hosting, LLC:

Catching Up with GedSite

Here are the new features in version 1.5.1, released today, and other recent changes

North Andover, MA – May 1, 2017Family History Hosting, LLC is pleased to announce GedSite version 1.5.1, the most recent release of the must-have tool for any genealogist creating web sites from GEDCOM files. Here are some of the features in today’s release and other releases from the past 60 days:

  • Box Charts allow you to add graphical descendant and pedigree charts to your site. The charts include an Accent facility where you can highlight members of the chart who pass criteria that you specify. So, for example, you can highlight your direct ancestors in a chart of all the descendants of one of your ancestors.
  • Relationship Charts show the relationship between two people in a box chart format that includes all the people in the lines of descent from a common ancestor. Relationship charts are an interesting way to show how you are related to a notable ancestor or cousin. Like GedSite’s other charts, you may use the Accent facility to highlight selected members of the chart.